Key Idea: A model of something is similar to but not exactly like the thing being modeled.

Students are expected to know that:

  1. A model represents (brings to mind) one or more aspects of the thing being modeled.
  2. While a model represents one or more aspects of the thing being modeled, it does not represent all aspects of the thing being modeled.
Frequency of selecting a misconception

Misconception
ID Number

Student Misconception

Grades
6–8
Grades
9–12

MOM003

A model should look like the object, event, or process it is modeling (with the possible exception that it can be smaller). Therefore, a diagram or graph could be considered a model only if it bore a physical resemblance to what is being represented (Grosslight et al., 1991; Penner et al., 1997; Treagust, et al. 2002; Schwartz & White, 2005).

See the Original Project

Frequency of selecting a misconception was calculated by dividing the total number of times a misconception was chosen by the number of times it could have been chosen, averaged over the number of students answering the questions within this particular idea.