Item BF123003: Molecules from food are absorbed into microscopically small blood vessels (capillaries) located in the walls of the digestive tract and then pass into larger blood vessels that carry the molecules to other parts of the body.

How do molecules from food move from the digestive tract to the rest of the body?

  1. Molecules from food are absorbed directly into large blood vessels located in the walls of the digestive tract and then carried by large blood vessels to other parts of the body.
  2. Molecules from food are absorbed into microscopically small blood vessels (capillaries) located in the walls of the digestive tract and then pass into larger blood vessels that carry the molecules to other parts of the body.
  3. Molecules from food move directly from the digestive tract into large digestive tubes and are then carried by these large tubes to other parts of the body.
  4. Molecules from food move from the digestive tract into microscopically small digestive tubes and then pass into larger digestive tubes that carry the molecules to other parts of the body.

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